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Last spring (2012) JoAnn and I took a trip back east, mostly to look at Civil War sites in Virginia where Amanda and Marshall would have been located. Toward the end of the trip we took the opportunity to visit a few Professor E.D. Cope sites. We took time to visit a small Quaker college in eastern Pennsylvania called Haverford. Haverford is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, United States, a suburb of Philadelphia. All students of the College are undergraduates, and nearly all reside on campus.
haverford College Campus

Haverford College Campus

My interest in Haverford was related to the fact that Cope taught here in 1866 and 1867.  I wanted to visit a place where Cope spent time.
haverford College Campus

Haverford College Campus

Upon returning to Philadelphia in 1864 the Cope family made every effort to secure Edward a teaching post as the Professor of Zoology at Haverford College, a small Quaker school where the family had philanthropic ties. The college awarded him an honorary master's degree so he could have the position. The College was founded in 1833 by area members of the Orthodox Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) to ensure an education grounded in Quaker values for young Quaker men. JoAnn and I walked through the campus which was beautiful. We walked past several buildings, some of which existed when Cope taught here just two years after the end of the Civil War.
Haverford College Campus

Haverford College Campus

For Cope, teaching at Haverford was a distraction from what he really wanted to do which is science. Cope found educating his students at Haverford "a pleasure" but wrote to his father that he "could not get any work done."
Haverford College Campus

Haverford College Campus

Cope resigned from his position at Haverford and moved his family to Haddonfield, in part to be closer to the fossil beds of western New Jersey. Due to the time-consuming nature of his Haverford position, Cope had not had time to attend to his farm near West Chester and had let it out to others, but eventually found he was in need of more money to fuel his scientific habits. Pleading with his father for money to pursue his career, he finally sold the farm in 1869. We loved our visit to Haverford... a beautiful, friendly, and welcoming college campus.